Dating and violence

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You may have heard people say things like, “Why would she /he stay with him/her if they are abusing them ? ” These comments and questions can be hurtful and blaming of the person who is experiencing the violence.They suggest that the victim/survivor is doing something wrong, rather than the perpetrator of the violence.Dating violence has become an issue of increasing concern to researchers and practitioners over the past three decades.This paper considers how dating violence is defined, what its consequences are, and what can be done about it.It can take many forms, including physical violence, coercion, threats, intimidation, isolation, and emotional, sexual or economic abuse.

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When comparing violence in both relational contexts, we found that, in terms of perpetration, more dating partners reported physical abuse and severe forms of physical abuse than married partners. Marital violence has been a widely studied topic since the seventies, whereas violence between dating partners has become the object of growing attention since Makepeace pioneer study in 1981 [1].You may have difficulty deciding if you want to date just one person, or go out with lots of people.You may feel rejected by someone you ask out and they turn you down. You might be bullied and abused by your partner ...Unfortunately, teen dating violence—the type of intimate partner violence that occurs between two young people who are, or who were once in, an intimate relationship—is a serious problem in the United States.A national survey found that ten percent of teens, female and male, had been the victims of physical dating violence within the past year and can increase the risk of physical injury, poor academic performance, binge drinking, suicide attempts, unhealthy sexual behaviors, substance abuse, negative body image and self-esteem, and violence in future relationships.

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